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K. Renato Lings ©

 

 

 

 

AREAS OF INTEREST


  


Homosexuality & the Bible

Gender, Sexuality and Love in the Bible

Bible Translation Trouble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

TEXTS

 

 Created Male & Female
Adam's Two Sides
Genesis 1
–3

The Language of Sex
Sexual Intercourse in Genesis

"To Know in the Biblical Sense"

More Accurate: To Know in the Greek Sense

Noah's Nakedness
Disrespect and Curse in Genesis 9

Sodom and Gomorrah
A Tale of Vulnerability
and Injustice
Genesis 18–19

Coded Crime Fiction
The Bloody Feud Between David & Saul
Judges 19–20

With a Male You Shall Not Lie
Male–Male Incest Prohibited?
Leviticus 18:22 & 20:13

Consecrated Ones
Canaanite Priestesses & Priests
Deuteronomy 23:18

Paul's Passions and Polemics

(a) "Against Nature" in Romans 1

(b) "Softies" and "Male-Liers" in
1 Corinthians 6:9 (cf. 1 Timothy 1:10)

The Language of Love
How the Bible Expresses Affection
Between Two People, including
Same-sex Love

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CURRENT PROJECTS



1. To detoxify the Bible.


This project is intimately connected with the rest of my work. It 
highlights the aim to make the Bible accessible to a great
number of people who feel alienated from it.

For centuries the Bible has been cast in the role of bully. Women
have been taught that they are inferior 'on biblical grounds'. Lesbian,
gay, bisexual and transgender people have been told that there is
no respectable place for them in the faith community. Again this
message is delivered 'on biblical grounds'. As a result, millions of 
spiritual seekers hesitate—or refuse—to pick up a Bible. They view
it as a source of discrimination and abuse.

I regard this situation as a major tragedy. In my experience the
Bible has been misrepresented. The creation story in the book of
Genesis does not present woman as inferior to man. They were
created equal. The first human being is a gender ambiguous 
'earthling', who is both male and female. To overcome loneliness it
becomes divided into two. The so-called 'fall' is no tragedy but
illustrates the need for all human beings to grow up into adulthood
and take responsibility for our lives.

No text in the Bible deals with the modern notion of
'homosexuality'. In the Hebrew Bible, the story of Sodom and
Gomorrah discusses the plight of the poor and vulnerable, particularly immigrants. Leviticus 18 provides a detailed catalogue
of incestuous liaisons that are prohibited. This includes sexual
intimacy with close male relatives (Lev. 18:22).
The fictional story told in Judges 19-20 describes heterosexual gang
rape made possible through death threats to the victim's husband.
The agenda underlying this story is fiercely political
(pro-David, anti-Saul).

In the Second (New) Testament, Paul opposes idolatry and sexual
orgies in pagan temples (Romans 1:26-27). In 1 Corinthians 6:9 he
criticizes people who are 'softies' (malakoi), i.e. spineless. Perhaps
this Greek word alludes to those whose Christian faith is weak.
The mysterious arsenokoitai, 'bed-males', may be a reference to
men who kidnap or coerce young people into prostitution. 

 

2. To take a leap of faith.


This long journey with the Bible began as a leap of faith. It has
provided one of the greatest and happiest surprises of my life:
my low-grade chronic depression has lifted. 

I am often reminded of the two parables in Matt. 13 which
describe the hidden treasure and the pearl of great value. I firmly
believe that thousands like me can find healing and empowerment
in the pages of the ancient gem called the Bible, when it is
interpreted in life-affirming ways.

This amazing work of art contains a wealth of treasures waiting to 
be explored. It is true that understanding the Bible requires patience 
and perseverance. But the reward is to be found at the end of
the rainbow. The Bible addresses the concerns of all people,
although often in unexpected ways. 

It is my desire to share the rich insights into the human
condition that I continually find on the pages of the Bible.

 


3. To publish a full-length book with a fresh approach
to the Bible/Homosexuality issue.


The Spanish version of this book focuses on texts in the Old (Second) Testament. It was edited at the Latin American Biblical University
in Costa Rica and published in 2011.
The book is available from Amazon.com and Amazon.es under the title
Biblia y homosexualidad ΏSe equivocaron los traductores?

A longer English version, which includes texts in both Testaments,
appeared in June 2013 (Trafford Publishing, 700 pp.). The title is:
Love Lost in Translation:
Homosexuality and the Bible
This book is available from Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk,
Barnes & Noble, Trafford Publishing, etc.

 


4. To share some key aspects of my biblical research.


I am in the process of producing a series of articles in
several languages for various periodicals and journals as well as
writing a book in Danish.





5. To offer lectures, workshops and seminars.




6. To continue my linguistic enquiries into crucial texts
of the Bible.


Numerous important Bible texts are under-researched from a
linguistic point of view. This is true of the creation story in
Genesis 1–3; the obscure offence committed by Ham against
his father Noah (Gen. 9); the story of
Sodom and Gomorrah in
Genesis 18–19; the prohibition in Leviticus 18:22; the "consecrated
ones" in Deuteronomy 23; the crime of Gibeah in Judges 19–20,
and several texts found in the letters of Paul
.

A similar concern applies to the popular phrase "to know in the
biblical sense", which has no philological basis. It would be far
more accurate to say "to know in the Greek sense." Very little 
attention has been paid so far to the technical role(s) of yada,
"know", in early Hebrew legal terminology. The same is true of
the biblical terms for betrothal, marriage, consummation, 
and sex, many of which hark back to the ancient laws of 
King Hammurabi of Babylonia (eighteenth century BCE).

 

 

7. Correspondence

 


 I APPRECIATE RECEIVING
 

  • Proposals for cooperation
     
  • Invitations
     
  • Offers of support
     
  • Words of encouragement.



My contact address is

biblioglot
AT
gmailDOTcom


In friendship

Renato Lings PhD